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UC Merced 2005 Chancellor's Forum Lecture Series Debuts April 14

March 30, 2005

FRESNO — UC Merced will share information about the university's cutting-edge research directly with the people who will benefit from the scientific discoveries as part of the Chancellor's Forum Lecture Series. Regional issues with global implications, such as renewable energy sources, water supply and quality, and urban growth, will be a focus of the series leading up to the opening of UC Merced.

UC Merced Chancellor Carol Tomlinson Keasey today (April 8) announced the debut of this special lecture series, to be held at the university's education and outreach centers in Bakersfield, Fresno, Merced and at the Great Valley Center in Modesto.

“Research is a cornerstone for the University of California,” said Tomlinson-Keasey. “At UC Merced, our faculty members are already engaged in a variety of research projects that will help us better understand issues specific to the San Joaquin Valley. The goal is to find solutions to regional problems and then apply these solutions nationally and internationally.”

“The purpose of the Chancellor's Forum lectures is to share some of these research projects with the Valley community and in the process, create a better understanding of UC Merced,” added Tomlinson-Keasey.

In keeping with UC Merced's mission to meet the educational needs of Valley residents, a total of five Chancellor's Forum lectures will be presented throughout the region this spring. Providing information about developments in research that will benefit the public is a primary objective.

The lectures are free and open to the public. The following is a schedule of events:

Thursday, April 14, 5:30 p.m. - 7:15 p.m.
Tri-College Center, Room TC1
3600 M Street, Merced

“Quenching the Valley's Thirst: The Connection Between Sierra Nevada Snowpack and Regional Water Supply”
Western snowpacks, such as those in the Sierra Nevada, sustain the streamflow and groundwater recharge for most of the West, including California's Central Valley region. Yet they hold less water than 50 years ago and this trend is expected to continue as the climate warms even further. What does this mean to the Valley where we need water for a variety of purposes such as clean water to drink and adequate water to irrigate agricultural land?

Lecture Team:Sam Traina, director, UC Merced's Sierra Nevada Research Institute, and Roger Bales, professor, UC Merced's School of Engineering, will discuss the university's research aimed at offering solutions to regional issues such as climate, hydrology and water resource problems.

RSVP by Tuesday, April 12. Seating is limited.

Reservations by phone: (209) 724-4416

E-mail:  specialevents@ucmerced.edu

Hors d'oeuvres and beverages will be served.

Tuesday, April 19, 5:30 p.m. - 7:15 p.m.

UC Merced Center, Fresno
Inyo-Kern Room

550 E. Shaw Avenue, Fresno

“Infection and Infertility: The Often Silent but Serious Link”
More and more evidence points to a link between low-level infections, such as chlamydia, and miscarriage and infertility. This has significant ramifications for the San Joaquin Valley. Fresno County has one of the highest rates of chlamydia infections in California, with the most occurrences in young adults. Developing a vaccine is the best hope for stopping the spread of chlamydia and related health ailments. Yet chlamydia infections often go undetected and untreated because of the bacteria's elusiveness. A woman may not know of her infection until she tries to become pregnant and discovers she is infertile. Learn how UC Merced research in this area could offer new hope for developing a vaccine.

Lecture team:Maria Pallavicini, dean, and David Ojcius, professor, both with UC Merced's School of Natural Sciences, will discuss the university's research aimed at offering solutions to a regional and global public health issue.

RSVP by Thursday, April 14. Seating is limited.

Reservations by phone: (559) 241-7510

Email:  jeanie.smith@ucop.edu

Hors d'oeuvres and beverages will be served.

One hour of CME credit is being offered through the UCSF Fresno Office of Continuing Medical Education.

 

Thursday, May 5, 5:30 p.m. - 7:15 p.m.

Tri-College Center, Room TC1
3600 M Street, Merced

“The Road Ahead: Diversification and Urbanization in the Valley”
The San Joaquin Valley's population is expected to grow from its current level of 3.3 million to 7 million over the next 40 years. One of the fastest growing regions in the state, the Valley also is becoming increasingly more diverse. In 1970, 80 percent of the Central Valley's population was white non-Hispanic. By 2000, the group represented about half of the region's population. Growth also implies more urbanization, which will have significant impacts on farmland and the environment. The consequences of growth and diversification on public policy decisions in the Valley, particularly in the areas of transportation, health and educational planning, will be discussed. In addition, the Valley's future development will be explored using four possible scenarios for urban growth through 2040.

Lecture team: Kenji Hakuta, dean; Belinda Reyes, professor; and Michael B. Teitz, emeritus professor, all with UC Merced's School of Social Sciences, Humanities and Arts, will discuss the university's research aimed at addressing the social, economic and human development issues of the Central Valley.

RSVP by Thursday, April 28. Seating is limited.

Reservations by phone: (209) 724-4416

Email:  specialevents@ucmerced.edu

Hors d'oeuvres and beverages will be served

Tuesday, May 17, noon - 1:30 p.m.

UC Merced Center, Bakersfield
Lakes Room
2000 K Street, Bakersfield

“UC Merced Presents High-Tech Solutions to Protecting Water Quality”
Whether it's above or below the ground, water is key to some of the most pressing environmental problems in Kern County and throughout the San Joaquin Valley and state. Quality of water is essential to maintaining the quality of life we currently enjoy. Imagine networks of sensors as wispy as a single strand of hair that can gauge when, where and how much pollution enters a body of water. Learn how UC Merced research will help us better understand and address critical water issues such as floods and droughts, reservoirs, groundwater quality, water pollution, and rivers and their surrounding habitats.

Lecture team:Jeff R. Wright, dean, and Thomas C. Harmon, associate professor, both with UC Merced's School of Engineering, will discuss the university's research aimed at addressing and offering solutions to regional and statewide environmental issues.

RSVP by Tuesday, May 10. Seating is limited.

Reservations by phone: (661) 861-7955

Email: rthomas@ucmerced.edu

Lunch will be served.

Tuesday, May 24, noon - 1:30 p.m.

Great Valley Center
201 Needham Street, Modesto

“Putting Solar Power to Work”

Presented in partnership with The Great Valley Center

Solar energy has dramatic potential for relieving California's dependencies on traditional energy sources, with commensurate positive impact on environmental quality. This is particularly true for the Central Valley. The UC Merced Energy Institute is developing a strong research program that will result in major advances in our ability to harness solar energy. Learn how UC Merced research is already leveraging our solar resources to provide alternative energy sources, and how the university will provide unprecedented opportunities for renewable energy studies.

Lecture team:Jeff R. Wright, dean, and Roland Winston, professor, both with UC Merced's School of Engineering, will discuss the university's research aimed at creating renewable energy alternatives.

RSVP by Tuesday, May 17. Seating is limited.

Reservations by phone: (209) 724-4416

Email:  specialevents@ucmerced.edu

Lunch will be served.

This year's Chancellor's Forum Lecture Series will be the first of an annual series sponsored by the University of California, Merced.